3 Foods To Gain Protein As A Vegetarian

Sorry macaroni and cheese won't cut it.

July 18, 2019

Courtesy of Gianni Giancola

Categories: 

Vegetarianism is not a gateway to eat whatever you want. Try again! Vegetarians need protein in their diets. What proteins? We're glad you asked!

What is a protein? (Found at Web M.D.)

  • "Proteins are made of amino acids, which function as a cell's 'building blocks.'" 

Proteins are essential for many purposes in the human body. Proteins are amino acids that help make the body's skin, tissue and organs function correctly. Amino acids help decompose foods in the stomach. Your body creates some amino acids but not all. Essential amino acids come from foods that you eat. As a vegetarian one has to be eating foods that will help nourish the body since animal proteins are out of the equation. 

According to Healthline.com nutrition researcher, Kris Gunnars, with a Bachelor's degree in medicine states: 

"The DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, or 0.36 grams per pound."

That means, "56 grams per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman," should be consumed.

For anyone who does not know what sedentary means... It means a person who does not get a lot of physical exercise. 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The order of protein is not in any specific order: (Nutrition DIFFERS on the foods listed below per store bought items.)

All foods have pros vs. cons. Do your own research to be fully aware of each protein listed below before making any dietary changes. 

LENTILS: 1 cup of cooked Lentils is equivalent to 18g of protein, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Nutrient Database.

  • Lentils are high in fiber and low in calories.
  • Lentils are also good for lowering blood pressure. 
  • Lentils are a very good source of vitamin-B. 

SEITAN: 2.5 ounces of Seitan is equivalent to 17g of protein, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Nutrient Database.

  • Seitan is low in carbs and low in calories. 
  • Seitan is high in protein. (seitan is not a complete source of protein. Must be paired with other foods to compelete bodily needs.)
  • Seitan is free of soy. 

BLACK BEANS: 1 cup of black beans is equivalent to 10g of protein, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Nutrient Database.

  • Black beans are low in sodium and have potassium. (Good for lowering blood pressure.)
  • Black beans help bone strength.
  • Black beans have a sufficient source of fiber and potassium. (Good for heart health.)